Writing

Annotated Bibliography

 

Keesey, Douglas. “Tracing the Postmodern Sublime.” Papers on Language & Literature,

vol. 42, no. 2, Spring2006, pp. 220-223. EBSCOhost, proxygsu-sful.galileo.usg.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=20949405&site=lrc-live.

“Tracing the Postmodern Sublime” is a review on the works of Samuel Coale.  His book, Paradigms of Paranoia, is his take on society’s obsession with conspiracies, information overload, and mistrust with our government.  None of these obsessions are of lunacy, but of actual witnessing corruption the national government has to offer.  What Coale in his book, and Keesey in his review are explaining is that through modern texts such as The Matrix and The Divinci Code we can track where our everyday paranoia lies.

What do these events mean to the average people: September 11th, the Watergate Scandal, the Iran-Contra Affair.  What might come to mind is Terrorism, Fear, Corruption, and those wouldn’t be wrong conclusions.  There’s a lot the average day person can bring to mind when thinking of an apocalypse, and these few things would be first.  From this piece of writing can come many bindings to why people are so afraid, especially of the government, and that’s important to understand before delving into where you can find these expressions of fear.

 

Brooker, Charlie. “Black Mirror.” Black Mirror. Netflix. 4 Dec. 2011. Television.

The hit Netflix show Black Mirror is centered around dark and twisted themes that examine modern society and the unanticipated consequences with the advancement of new technology.  Each episode features a different plot that covers what could happen in a slight turn of events, much like The Twilight Zone. It characterizes the fears we have about a technological apocalypse and uses those in many different ways to convey the dangers of having modern life revolve around technology.

This series perfectly articulates why we are still in the postmodern literary era.  Literature such as “The Veldt” (1950) and “There Will Come Soft Rains” (1950), both short stories by Ray Bradbury, and Catch-22 (1961) by Joseph Heller show that Black Mirror has been created in a mirror image of these decades old novels. .  This show tells us that postmodern literature can make that switch from novels to actual television.

Collins, Suzanne.The Hunger Games. New York: Scholastic, 2008. Print.

Everyone knows of The Hunger Games, a trilogy about a young girl named Katniss living in District 12 in a post apocalyptic era.  These books have been made into 4 hit seller movies and have won more than 50 awards.  The plot is as follows, When Katniss Everdeen’s sister Primrose is chosen be apart of the feared Hunger Games, a dark game where 24 kids from the ages of 12-18 from all 12 districts are picked to fight to the death, Katniss volunteers to take her place.   The series follows Katniss from the volunteering, to her victory in the games, all the way to her battle with taking down the twisted Capital, who placed the kids in the games from the beginning.  

From these facts we can again conclude that this series is yet another example of how we still exist in the postmodern era.  The paranoia of our government and the apocalyptic themes characterize yet another novel to add to the library.  Technology can cause so much wonder and amazement, yet it lies on very fine line of fear and paranoia.  The technology in The Hunger Games shows a stark contrast from the districts and the capital.  The capital remains in power, much like modern day government, and it is abuzz with all types of technology.  The districts however, are poor and remain with little to no power.  The capital uses technology and power to create a hold of fear in the districts by creating these “games” that the children must participate in, which are surrounded by technological advances in the future, such as the use of hybrids and a fake environment for the children to play survival in.

 

Reading

Experiencing Killing Lincoln

Experiencing Killing Lincoln

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Bill O’Reilly, The O’Reilly Factor

Bill O’Reilly…  He is the controversial figure with his own segment (The O’Reilly Factor) on Fox News.  Some may hate him, some may love him, but we all must agree after reading Killing Lincoln, a retelling of Abraham Lincoln written in 2011,  he is an amazing writer.

 

The work Killing Lincoln pieces together Abraham Lincoln’s final days alive.  It starts at the beginning of the end of the Civil War.  With the surrender of General Robert E. Lee, along with several of the last final battles, it feels as if you’re there watching them, witnessing the tragedies and death of the final moments of the Civil War.  The reader feels Lincoln’s love for his country, and John Booth’s, Lincoln’s assassinator, loathing for the Union’s cause.  It really goes into depth and quality of not just a couple, but ALL of the characters and components of these few fateful days.  From Booth’s co-conspirators to even General Ulysses S. Grant’s wife, he covers all aspects of the heroic, yet underlying tragic days.

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From the very beginning of the story the reader immediately delves into Abraham Lincoln’s  perspective.  The details are startling and chilling.  Even the first chapter leaves the reader captivated as it begins the story with Mr. Lincoln pacing the steamboat known as The River Queen out in broad daylight.  Each of these events that O’Reilly captures are surprising and make up each of the characters personalities.  Such examples are Lincoln’s fearlessness of walking The River Queen in broad daylight without any protection from nearby Confederates, or the determinedness of the Confederate soldiers as they marched towards Amelia Court House in hopes of food and supplies in chapter 4. There’s even a  small detail in chapter 38 about Joseph Burroughs, nicknamed “Peanut John” who held John Booth’s horse, unknowing of the fact that Booth was about to kill the most historical man in American History.

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Because all of these details are true, it makes for such a great book. O’really’s style of writing gives the reader a sort of heritage of American History, while also telling of heroic battles and detailed conversations, that even if they weren’t accurate, would still make Killing Lincoln an epic read.  While reading this, I almost felt like I had a seat at the theatre where Lincoln was killed. It was difficult for me to put the book down.

Writing

Cover Letter Writers Memo

Cover Letter

 

 

In this cover letter I was trying to complete the inevitable.  The college application process.  Sooner or later we’re all going to have to do it.  Weather you have or haven’t, its the experience of having it loom over your shoulder.  By completing this I’m giving myself the chance to have others look over it for me and give me help and advise, while also completing a work assignment.  Basically killing 2 birds with one stone.  Please, if you have any advise to make this a more effective letter let me know.

Semantics · Writing

What do we really know?

Since childhood, the people of the world are taught what to think, say, feel, and even believe. Since then, we have stood alone yet the social norms latch us all together.  The Weeknd presents to us Losers; that maybe we all do ¨make our own sense¨ (The Weeknd 7)  and that to have a different perspective of the world does not make a person unintelligent. Just because we may think and perceive life differently, who is to say what is normal or not?

The lyrics of this song obviously rely heavily on Pathos, as most songs do.  Ironically, this only strengthens the argument of the theme.  This shows us that how we feel and what we think is real, as well as what all of us as human beings believe to be real, isńt necessarily true.  We all believe in something, even if that belief is that nothing is real… That is an opinion, and technically most of the scientific theories around us are as well.   Abel’s (The Weeknd) way of showing this to us is in the lines ¨So what can you show me, That my heart don’t know already?¨ (The Weeknd 9-10).  Again, we see it repeated in the lines ¨They can’t teach what they can’t prove” (The Weeknd 15).  

In an odd way,  the Pathos also provides Logos to this song.  The theme of this song is that we don’t necessarily know what is true and what is make believe.  While it isn’t technically Logos, it relates to it in an important way.   How can we fully know and comprehend something that is based on a guess? In reality, how can we rely on anyone but ourselves to make decisions and provide theoretical knowledge? This is implied in the line, “We did it all alone,” (The Weeknd 29), and again in the line, “So what can you show me, that my heart don’t know already?” (The Weeknd 9-10)

All of these things lead us to the last method in Aristotelian’s model, Ethos.  The Weeknd mentions several times in his songs “And you’re qualified to me.”(The Weeknd 8)  This is a perfect way to explain the Ethos in his theme.  The credibility of this message cannot be proven, and that is his entire point.   “They can’t teach what they can’t prove”, (The Weeknd 15)  and again,  “Come put this inside a test-tube” (The Weeknd 16) represents thoroughly how one will create test after test to hypothesize a theory.

And this links us to our conclusion …While the Ethos and Logos can technically be counted as the same ideology (and the song mostly revolves around Pathos), all these three theories combined connect and link together to create one single theme. This theme is to show how we think and contemplate our ideas and our emotions and finally,  not every idea is the exact same.  Perception is your own personal reality.

Reading

Homelessness “The Men in the Storm”

In the short story “The Men in the Storm” we can pinpoint many characteristics.  First off, it’s very cold.  We can find that detail many, many times throughout this story, but we can also find the sharp contrast between the rich and the poor.  Stephen Crane depicts two very different groups of people.  From the carriages and men bustling home from a warm meal to the poor men waiting outside of the soup kitchen, we see the wealth contrast.

 

Writing

Revision Memo for “A Walk in the Park”

For my revision my goal was really just to perfect the text I had written.  I didn’t want to mess with it too much for fear that I would mess up my writing.  I took my comments into consideration and decided to leave it as it was.  I received a comment mentioning how the ending was a bit off putting, but considering the story was all leading up to that one point I didn’t want to change it.

A Walk in the Park – Bi-Weekly Rough Draft