Writing

Annotated Bibliography

 

Keesey, Douglas. “Tracing the Postmodern Sublime.” Papers on Language & Literature,

vol. 42, no. 2, Spring2006, pp. 220-223. EBSCOhost, proxygsu-sful.galileo.usg.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=20949405&site=lrc-live.

“Tracing the Postmodern Sublime” is a review on the works of Samuel Coale.  His book, Paradigms of Paranoia, is his take on society’s obsession with conspiracies, information overload, and mistrust with our government.  None of these obsessions are of lunacy, but of actual witnessing corruption the national government has to offer.  What Coale in his book, and Keesey in his review are explaining is that through modern texts such as The Matrix and The Divinci Code we can track where our everyday paranoia lies.

What do these events mean to the average people: September 11th, the Watergate Scandal, the Iran-Contra Affair.  What might come to mind is Terrorism, Fear, Corruption, and those wouldn’t be wrong conclusions.  There’s a lot the average day person can bring to mind when thinking of an apocalypse, and these few things would be first.  From this piece of writing can come many bindings to why people are so afraid, especially of the government, and that’s important to understand before delving into where you can find these expressions of fear.

 

Brooker, Charlie. “Black Mirror.” Black Mirror. Netflix. 4 Dec. 2011. Television.

The hit Netflix show Black Mirror is centered around dark and twisted themes that examine modern society and the unanticipated consequences with the advancement of new technology.  Each episode features a different plot that covers what could happen in a slight turn of events, much like The Twilight Zone. It characterizes the fears we have about a technological apocalypse and uses those in many different ways to convey the dangers of having modern life revolve around technology.

This series perfectly articulates why we are still in the postmodern literary era.  Literature such as “The Veldt” (1950) and “There Will Come Soft Rains” (1950), both short stories by Ray Bradbury, and Catch-22 (1961) by Joseph Heller show that Black Mirror has been created in a mirror image of these decades old novels. .  This show tells us that postmodern literature can make that switch from novels to actual television.

Collins, Suzanne.The Hunger Games. New York: Scholastic, 2008. Print.

Everyone knows of The Hunger Games, a trilogy about a young girl named Katniss living in District 12 in a post apocalyptic era.  These books have been made into 4 hit seller movies and have won more than 50 awards.  The plot is as follows, When Katniss Everdeen’s sister Primrose is chosen be apart of the feared Hunger Games, a dark game where 24 kids from the ages of 12-18 from all 12 districts are picked to fight to the death, Katniss volunteers to take her place.   The series follows Katniss from the volunteering, to her victory in the games, all the way to her battle with taking down the twisted Capital, who placed the kids in the games from the beginning.  

From these facts we can again conclude that this series is yet another example of how we still exist in the postmodern era.  The paranoia of our government and the apocalyptic themes characterize yet another novel to add to the library.  Technology can cause so much wonder and amazement, yet it lies on very fine line of fear and paranoia.  The technology in The Hunger Games shows a stark contrast from the districts and the capital.  The capital remains in power, much like modern day government, and it is abuzz with all types of technology.  The districts however, are poor and remain with little to no power.  The capital uses technology and power to create a hold of fear in the districts by creating these “games” that the children must participate in, which are surrounded by technological advances in the future, such as the use of hybrids and a fake environment for the children to play survival in.

 

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